THE FAMOUS CASE OF PHINEAS GAGE.

We know Phinea’s history and how it moves the neuroscience field. Now the earlier conclusios are been questioned.

So it was the infection’s fault?

Let’s wait  a little more, but this paper sheds new lights about the case.

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0037454

#lc staff   #lc eqp

Édouard Boubat (1923–1999) was a French photojournalist and art photographer.

Boubat was born in Montmartre, Paris. He studied typography and graphic arts at the École Estienne and worked for a printing company before becoming a photographer. In 1943 he was subjected to service du travail obligatoireforced labour of French people in Nazi Germany, and witnessed the horrors of World War II. He took his first photograph after the war in 1946 and was awarded the Kodak Prize the following year. He travelled the world for the French magazine Réalités and later worked as a freelance photographer. French poet Jacques Prévert called him a “peace correspondent” as he was apolitical and photographed uplifting subjects. His son Bernard Boubat is also a photographer.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89douard_Boubat

What is Alzheimer’s disease? Causes, symptoms and treatment

Alzheimer’s disease is a neurological disorder in which the death of brain cells causes memory loss and cognitive decline. A neurodegenerative type of dementia, the disease starts mild and gets progressively worse.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/159442.php

The Aging Brain

The Aging Brain Needs REST

#lc staff 

#lc eqp

“Dementia is not an inevitable result of aging,” said Yankner, who is also co-director of the Paul F. Glenn Laboratories for Biological Mechanisms of Aging. “We know it’s possible for the human brain to work normally for a century or more. So a robust mechanism must have evolved to preserve brain function and keep brain cells alive in long-lived organisms like us. We just haven’t learned what that mechanism is.”

http://neurosciencenews.com/rest-gene-alzheimers-neurology-871/

A new study shows that a gene regulator called REST, dormant in the brains of young people (left), switches on in normal aging brains (center) to protect against various stresses, including abnormal proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases. REST is lost in critical brain regions of people with Alzheimer’s (right). Credit Yankner Lab.

Stem cells help repair traumatic brain injury by building a “biobridge,” USF researchers report.

LC #eqp

Scientists at the University of South Florida have identified a new way by which stem cells might repair a traumatic brain injury (#TBI). The research, published in PLoS ONE, shows that transplanted #stemcells serve as a “bridge” to link the injured brain site with healthy areas of the brain where new neural cells are being created. Previous work had given rise to two different hypotheses about how stem cells could repair TBI damage: the stem cells actually replaced the injured tissue or they secreted chemicals that told the brain to repair the injury. This latest study indicates that it might occur by a third way. Rats that received stem cell treatments after a TBI didn’t have any proliferation of stem cells but did of their own neural cells. Further experiments indicated that it was the transplantation of the stem cells that enabled the rats’ own brain cells to proliferate. The researchers concluded that the stem cells likely form a bridge that enables their ability to repair the injury, although they still don’t know exactly how this is accomplished.

http://hscweb3.hsc.usf.edu/blog/2013/10/02/stem-cells-help-repair-traumatic-brain-injury-by-building-a-biobridge-usf-researchers-report/

When in doubt, tell the truth.
Mark Twain… (via quotedojo)
(Reblogged from positively-elementary)

In the wake of the new J. D. Salinger biography, Joyce Maynard, author of the poignant At Home in the World: A Memoir, steps forward to reveal an ominous side of the revered author, exploring its implications for our cultural mythology of genius and how it bespeaks “the quiet acceptance, apparently alive and well in our culture, of the notion that genius justifies cruel or abusive treatment of those who serve the artist and his art”:

I was 18 when he wrote to me in the irresistible voice of Holden Caulfield, though he was 53 at the time. Within months I left school to live with Salinger; gave up my scholarship; severed relationships with friends; disconnected from my family; forswore all books, music, food and ideas not condoned by him. At the time, I believed I’d be with Jerry Salinger forever.
His was a seduction played out with words and ideas, not lovemaking, but to the young girl reading those words — as with a few million other readers — there could have been no more powerful allure.
Salinger wasn’t simply brilliant, funny, wise; he burrowed into one’s brain, seeming to understand things nobody else ever had. His expressions of admiration (“I couldn’t have created a character I love more than you”) were intoxicating. His dismissal and contempt, when they came, were devastating.
I was 19 when he put two $50 bills in my hand and sent me away. Years after he dismissed me, his voice stayed in my head, offering opinions on everything he loved and all that he condemned. This was true even though, on his list of the condemned, was my own self.
[…]
I am now 59. Let a man tell me now that I am of no worth or value, and never will be and the man will be diminished in my eyes. But when a man who had become for me the possessor of all wisdom told me these things, when I was 18, the one diminished was myself.
[…]
There is art, and there are artists. Let’s not confuse the two.

Artwork by Eleni Kalorkoti

In the wake of the new J. D. Salinger biography, Joyce Maynard, author of the poignant At Home in the World: A Memoir, steps forward to reveal an ominous side of the revered author, exploring its implications for our cultural mythology of genius and how it bespeaks “the quiet acceptance, apparently alive and well in our culture, of the notion that genius justifies cruel or abusive treatment of those who serve the artist and his art”:

I was 18 when he wrote to me in the irresistible voice of Holden Caulfield, though he was 53 at the time. Within months I left school to live with Salinger; gave up my scholarship; severed relationships with friends; disconnected from my family; forswore all books, music, food and ideas not condoned by him. At the time, I believed I’d be with Jerry Salinger forever.

His was a seduction played out with words and ideas, not lovemaking, but to the young girl reading those words — as with a few million other readers — there could have been no more powerful allure.

Salinger wasn’t simply brilliant, funny, wise; he burrowed into one’s brain, seeming to understand things nobody else ever had. His expressions of admiration (“I couldn’t have created a character I love more than you”) were intoxicating. His dismissal and contempt, when they came, were devastating.

I was 19 when he put two $50 bills in my hand and sent me away. Years after he dismissed me, his voice stayed in my head, offering opinions on everything he loved and all that he condemned. This was true even though, on his list of the condemned, was my own self.

[…]

I am now 59. Let a man tell me now that I am of no worth or value, and never will be and the man will be diminished in my eyes. But when a man who had become for me the possessor of all wisdom told me these things, when I was 18, the one diminished was myself.

[…]

There is art, and there are artists. Let’s not confuse the two.

Artwork by Eleni Kalorkoti

(Reblogged from explore-blog)

BRAIN RESEARCH


LC #eqp 
A National Institutes of Health (NIH) working group has laid out nine research areas the new American federal neuroscience initiative – Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (#BRAIN) – will fund. While these research areas are still broad, firmer priorities may be set in the group’s final report, due June 2014. http://bit.ly/1aVT536

whole brain image credit: #NIH

(Reblogged from neurosciencestuff)